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1 jI2TvRyMPatOkvgnp9BqLg Medical communities are still not aware of what is causing people to suffer from conditions such as fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue syndrome, and SIBO. This lack of understanding often leads to incorrect diagnoses, like parasites, which are one of the current scapegoats for health issues such as these. When a person is handed this diagnosis, usually parasites are not actually the issue and something else in her or his body is triggering symptoms and conditions. Becoming infected with a parasite is vastly different to dealing with some some bloating, gastritis, constipation, tummy aches, stitches, and fatigue.

The medical world has not reached a point yet where professionals can swiftly and accurately determine what is going on for someone internally. For example, the amount of byproduct the Epstein-Barr virus can expel in the liver and intestinal tract can lead a practitioner to believe that his or her patient is suffering from a parasitic infection. The problem with this diagnosis is that the person does not have a parasitic infection and is actually battling Epstein-Barr, a virus that can easily expel an abundance of byproduct and viral casings that get misdiagnosed as parasites because they've not yet been accurately identified.

In the book, Thyroid Healing, the Medical Medium goes into great detail about the different mutated strains of Epstein-Barr that are able to adapt in order to enter various organs. During this process, certain strains of this virus can actually change their casings, and medical professionals may misidentify these viral casings as bacteria or a type of parasite.

Various types of bugs can show up in a person's stool sample. Imagine mashing up a handful of insects and then trying to identify the different creepy-crawlers from the crushed pieces. It would be nearly impossible to tell which insects you were looking at from merely observing the smashed up bits. In a similar way, accurately identifying parasites in a stool sample is nearly impossible.

Rather than blaming parasitic activity for a patient's chronic fatigue, aches and pains, or gut issues, the blame should be directed at the actual unproductive microorganisms that are creating these problems. If the symptoms and conditions you are battling have led you to be diagnosed with a parasitic infection, there is a high likelihood you have been misdiagnosed and are actually suffering from a low-grade bacterial or viral infection. If your particular troubles include gut issues and inflammation, it is likely that a bacterial infection is the culprit. Depending on your unique symptoms and conditions, a viral infection could be responsible as well.

You may unknowingly have scar tissue and injuries in your intestinal tract and colon from old pockets of E. coli or streptococcus, or old viral deposits. Whether it be in your liver, spleen, pancreas, small intestine, or stomach lining, an abundance of scar tissue can trigger various issues. The health troubles you are fighting can be exacerbated by numerous variables including low hydrochloric acid, a sluggish liver, and food sensitivities. Fortunately, some of the healing steps health practitioners may have given you for a misdiagnosed parasitic infection, such as using herbs, may still have been helping you begin to heal the true cause of your health issues to some degree.

Dealing with A True Parasite

If you’ve been diagnosed with a parasitic infection in the past and are still alive today trying to manage the symptoms and conditions related to this supposed parasitic infection, there is a very likely chance that you were never actually dealing with a parasite. It is possible to become infected from an actual parasite, but when someone is suffering with a genuine parasite, either the person is able to knock the parasite out of her or his system, or the parasite can potentially end up killing the person. Bottom line, either you win or the parasite wins. There really isn’t an in between.